Sharon Cresci

Sharon Cresci, MD
Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director, Applied Genomics Core for SCCOR in Cardiac Dysfunction and Disease, Cardiovascular Division, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO

Contact Information:
Office: Clinical Science Research Building, Room 9928A
Laboratory: Clinical Science Research Building, Rooms 9926-9928
Secretary’s phone 314-362-5363
Fax 314-747-4758
E-mail: scresci@dom.wustl.edu

Education and Training:
State University of New York at Binghamton Binghamton, NY, B.S. Biochemistry, 1982
New York University School of Medicine, NY, NY, MD, Medicine 1986
1986 – 1989 House Officer, Department of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital / New York University Medical Center, New York, NY
1989 – 1990 Senior Chief Resident, Department of Medicine, Bellevue Hospital / New York University Medical Center, New York, NY
1990 – 1991 Clinical Fellow, Cardiology Division, Bellevue Hospital / New York University Medical Center, New York, NY
1991 – 1992 Clinical Fellow, Cardiovascular Division, Barnes Hospital/Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
1992 -1997 Research Fellow, Cardiovascular Division, Barnes Hospital/Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO
1997 – 2001 Instructor in Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
2001 – present Assistant Professor of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine
2007 – present Director, Applied Genomics Core for NIH Specialized Center for Clinically-Oriented Research (SCCOR) in Cardiac Dysfunction and Disease

Honors and Awards:
Phi Beta Kappa, 1981
B.S. with Honors, 1982
M.D. with Honors, 1986 (Honors Thesis: Characterization of the Cytochrome P450e Multigene Family.)
American Heart Association, Missouri Affiliate Fellowship Award 1993 -1994
National Research Scholarship Award 1994 -1996
Fellow’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2002

Clinical Expertise:
Echocardiography; Adults with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

Research Interests:
My research focuses on the association of genetic variation with clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease and on the role of genetic variation in the variable response to pharmacologic treatment (i.e. Pharmacogenomics) of cardiovascular disease. My specific interest is in individuals with both diabetes mellitus and coronary artery disease. The goal of my research is to ultimately be able to personalize each patient’s treatment based on their genotype.

Project 1: Association of PPAR-pathway gene polymorphisms with diabetic outcomes in BARI 2D
This project seeks to comprehensively investigate the genetic and pharmacogenetic associations of PPAR-pathway variants (genotypes and/or haplotypes) in a population with type 2 DM and coronary artery disease that has been extensively phenotyped, the BARI 2D cohort. BARI 2D has extensive diabetes-related (duration of DM, hemoglobin A1C, BMI, lipid status, presence of micro- and macro-albuminuria) and cardiovascular (angina status, extent of coronary artery disease, left ventricular function, degree and type of revascularization) baseline and follow-up phenotypic data, detailed data on medications and revascularization techniques, and rigorously collected long term clinical outcome data including rates of death, myocardial infarction, stroke, and re-hospitalization using a custom designed targeted-genotyping 3K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chip.

Project 2: Pharmacogenetics of Post-ACS Therapy
This project seeks to address the need for quantitative assessment of the predictive impact of relevant genetic variants in the context of modern therapy for an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). This project addresses the following Specific Aims: 1) To determine if SNPs in PPAR-pathway genes (genes involved in cardiac metabolism) will predict improved efficacy of ACE-I or BB therapy in preventing major adverse cardiovascular events or improving symptom score in patients with ACS; 2) To perform gene-environment interaction analyses to ascertain the impact of diabetes on the predictive power of PPAR-pathway genes for improved efficacy of ACE-I or BB therapy in preventing major adverse cardiovascular events or improving symptom score in patients with ACS; and 3) To develop a polygenic panel of SNPs in multiple genes regulating myocardial metabolism to predict improved efficacy of ACE-I or BB therapy in preventing major adverse cardiovascular events or improving symptom score among patients with ACS.

Applied Genomics Core:
The Applied Genomics Core (AGC) develops genetic tools for understanding the mechanistic basis for diabetes-associated cardiovascular disease. The AGC provides sample processing and analytical support to Project 2, including DNA extraction, gene informatics and sample genotyping.

Publications:

View Sharon Cresci’s publications on pubmed.gov